Browsing All Posts filed under »restoration«

Paying to restore urban streams

March 25, 2018

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Rivers and streams provide many ecosystem services, including the supply and purification of water, climate regulation, flood protection, fisheries, aesthetic values and recreation.  In urban settings, the loss of stream ecosystem services as a result of pollution, erosion and habitat degradation has prompted widespread attempts at environmental repair. However, although levels of investment in urban […]

Simplifying urban stream assessment

December 21, 2017

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Urban streams experience high levels of stormwater runoff and channel erosion, and represent a significant challenge for ecological restoration.  Nevertheless, it’s generally agreed that urban stream restoration should aim to mimic the natural (pre-development) flow regime as closely as possible.  It’s been proposed that ecologically important aspects of flow can be used as a basis […]

Restoration and invertebrates: Build it and at least some of them will come

September 25, 2017

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It’s commonly assumed that the biodiversity of a disturbed ecosystem can be improved by restoring its original physical and chemical conditions. According to this “Field of Dreams” view (“build it and they will come”), ecosystem recovery occurs through the recolonization activities of lost species.  While a lot of river restoration is founded on Field of […]

Restoration and invertebrates: Reappraising stream condition indicators

September 25, 2017

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In degraded rivers and stream systems, the replanting of riparian vegetation is a common restoration activity, partly because increases in shading, nutrient interception and litter fall are expected to provide food and habitat benefits for aquatic communities. Changed habitat conditions should be reflected in indices of stream condition, such as those based on macroinvertebrate richness. […]

Coarse, shallow and wooden… but useful nonetheless

June 19, 2017

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Coarse woody debris (CWD) derived from shoreline trees provides an important, spatially complex habitat and a food source for lake-dwelling organisms. Here are some interesting facts about lake CWD, taken from a recent review paper: In the absence of the physical action of flowing water, CWD breaks down more slowly in lakes than in streams. […]

Planting vegetation to stop stream bank erosion: where’s the evidence?

June 19, 2017

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Increased rates of stream bank erosion and sediment movement in disturbed catchments have been attributed to changes in catchment hydrology caused by land clearing, channel modification, the trampling activities of livestock and the removal of riparian vegetation. Given that these effects are human-induced, it’s commonly assumed that they can also be reversed by human intervention, […]

Restoration ecology: are we forgetting top-down control?

June 1, 2016

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Authors of a recent review article argue that restoration ecologists rely heavily on the assumption that natural communities are controlled by bottom-up processes (i.e., the upward transfer of nutrients and energy from plants to animals), but tend to ignore the complementary effects of top-down control by animals on nutrient cycling and the abundance and diversity […]